The Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine

Devoted to objectively analyzing the claims of alternative medicine.



Recent Articles

The Use of a Dietary Supplement Combination and an Essential Fatty Acid for Children with ADHD

by Alan W. Brue, Thomas D. Oakland, and Robert A. Evans in Original Research on October 1, 2001

Review of the Evidence for the Clinical Efficacy of Human Acupuncture

by David W. Ramey and Wallace Sampson in Analyses on October 1, 2001

“Alternative” Medicine: A Review of Studies Supported by Grants Awarded by the NCCAM

by Gunnar B. Stickler in Analyses on October 1, 2001

Stated Goals and Grants of the Office of Alternative Medicine/NCCAM

by Saul Green in Analyses on October 1, 2001

“Alternative” Medicine Survey Distortions: An Early Critique

by William T. Jarvis in Analyses on October 1, 2001

White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy: A Membership Directory

by Timothy Gorski in Commentaries on October 1, 2001

The Office of Alternative Medicine/NCCAM Should Be Abolished

by Edward C. Halperin in Commentaries on October 1, 2001

Notes on James S. Gordon, MD, Chair of the WHCCAMP

by E. Patrick Curry in Commentaries on October 1, 2001

Acupuncture Legislation: What Is the Point?

by George A. Ulett in Commentaries on October 1, 2001

Anomalous Improvement

by Donald A. Sandweiss, MD in Letters to the Editor on October 1, 2001

What is SRAM?

The purpose of the Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine is to apply the best tools of science and reason to determine whether hypotheses are valid and treatments are effective. It will reject no claims because it fits, or fails to fit, some paradigm. It will simply seek justified answers to two questions: "Is it true?" and "Does this treatment work?"

The publication of SRAM has been endorsed by the Commission for Scientific Medicine and Mental Health, a panel that includes prominent physicians, scientists, and Nobel prizewinners.